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ESG and VSA Simulations

The simulations in the DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_ESGSink ("ESG simulation") and DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_VSASource ("VSA simulation") design files define a pair of simulations that complement one another. These simulations are intended to be executed repeatedly one after the other, with the ESG simulation being executed first.

The ESG simulation generates and predistorts a modulated signal, passing it on to an ESG where the signal is output on an RF carrier. The RF output of the ESG is fed to a power amplifier that is connected through an attenuator to the VSA. The VSA simulation is then run to capture the downconverted received signal, bring that signal into the ADS domain and perform signal processing on it to update the set of coefficients used to predistort the signal in the ESG simulation.

Hardware Set-up

The following figure illustrates the set-up for interconnecting the ESG, amplifier under test (DUT), VSA and computer running ADS.

Besides the RF output of the ESG, two other outputs of the ESG are employed in the set-up. The ESG's Event 1 trigger and 10 MHz External Reference Out, both located on the back panel of the ESG, are connected to the VSA's External Trigger and 10 MHz External Reference input, respectively. It is also acceptable to connect the VSA's 10 MHz External Reference Out to the ESG's 10 MHz External Reference input, if preferred.

ESG Simulation

The DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_ESGSink simulation generates a complex baseband signal, predistorts that signal, and downloads it to the arbitrary waveform generators of an ESG. The complex baseband signal is a modulated signal that is gated off temporarily while a training signal is inserted into the signal path. The following plot shows the envelope of a typical baseband signal that is generated during the course of simulation.

Typical Complex Baseband Signal (envelope) to be Predistorted

The initial period of the modulated signal has two purposes:

  1. To provide a modulated signal that can be used to monitor the predistorter's performance; and
  2. As a basis for synchronizing the input signal and feedback signal prior to feeding both signals to the adaptation algorithm processing block.

The training signal is used by the adaptation algorithm to estimate the predistortion function and determine a new set of look-up table coefficients. The second period of the modulated signal is included to increase the proportion of the total modulated signal time to training signal time. The automatic level control mechanism of the ESG will operate more favorably if the total modulated signal time is greater than the training signal time.

Sample Rate and Complex Baseband Input Signal

All samples are passed between components at the top level of the simulation hierarchy at a uniform rate. This rate is equal to the DSPRate parameter, with the time step being equal to the DSPTStep parameter.

The ESG simulation sample rate should be set so that it does not exceed the maximum input sample rate of the VSA automatic level controls.

In the ESG simulation, the DSPRate parameter is dependent upon the parameters defining the modulation employed, specifically, the number of simulation samples per modulated symbol/chip and the symbol/chip rate of the modulation format. It is convenient to tie the simulation sampling rate to the modulation rate so that resampling of the modulated signal is not necessary.

A typical set of parameters defines the modulation signal and its format may include the following.

  • Symbol/chip rate
  • Number of samples per symbol/chip
  • Length of the pulse shaping filter, as well as an excess bandwidth (roll-off factor) if a (square-root) raised cosine filter is used

In the ESG simulation that employs the kmm_CDMA2K_FwdRCSrc component to generate a forward link cdma2000 base station signal, typical values of the system parameters defining the signal are as follows.

  • cdma2000ChipRate (1.2288e6)
  • cdma2000PulseShapingFilterLengthSymbols (64)
  • cdma2000SamplesperChip (32)
  • cdma2000XSBW (0.25)
  • cdma2000PeakMagnitude (0.75)

The first four parameters define those elements of the modulated signal described above. The final parameter, cdma2000PeakMagnitude, is the peak magnitude that the modulated signal source will produce. The peak magnitude of the modulated signal source is determined by running a separate simulation that uses the modulated signal source with the same parameter values that it will have within the ESG simulation. This separate simulation should be over a sufficient number of samples to accurately determine the peak magnitude that the signal source can generate.

An example of this can be seen in the design Test_PARofModSig_CDMA2kFwdSrc.dsn and its data display Test_PARofModSig.dds. The following displays are obtained using Test_PARofModSig_CDMA2kFwdSrc.dsn, and indicates the Peak Magnitude of the signal to be 0.75 V, as well as the CCDF of the signal.

CCDF and PeakMagnitude Display for Test_PAR...Test Benches

Training Signal

The training signal is a tone having an increasing magnitude, i.e. a ramp. The tone is generated by uniformly increasing the amplitude of the in-phase and quadrature component of the complex baseband signal.

In the ESG simulation, the ramp is divided into 3 segments as shown in the following illustration.

Training Signal (Ramp)

The length (in samples) of each portion of the training signal is determined by the following simulation parameters:

  • RampRampLength -the length of the rising portion of the ramp
  • RampRampHold - the duration for which the peak ramp magnitude is held
  • RampDownRampLength - the length of the trailing ramp

Only the rising portion of the ramp is used by the adaptation algorithm in the calculation of the predistortion function. The hold and trailing ramp portions are included to smooth the transition between power levels and minimize the impact of finite length filters on the latter part of the rising portion of the ramp.

The shape of the ramp can be changed to accommodate the particular look-up table indexing scheme being employed. The shape of the ramp can be controlled through the parameters of the Async_Ramp component. For instance, if magnitude addressing is the index scheme being used for the look-up table, the magnitude of the ramp should increase linearly so that an equal number of simulation sample points are distributed to each look-up table entry.

The shape of the falling portion of the ramp can also be adjusted through the parameters of the Async_Ramp component that controls its shape.

The magnitude of the ramp at its outset is determined by the value of the RampVOffset parameter. In some cases it may be desirable that the initial magnitude of the ramp be greater than 0.0 - for instance, to avoid low level noise that may be present in the system that is impacting system performance. If RampVOffset is set greater than zero, the user should ensure that the look-up table is being addressed over the desired range. That is, the look-up table address generator, AddressCalc component , does not necessarily take into account an offset magnitude on the incoming baseband signal; thus, if the initial ramp magnitude is non-zero, the lowest address generated (at the outset of the ramp) may not be 0, i.e. one or more of the initial addresses in the look-up table will not be referenced.

The point during the simulation at which the modulated signal is gated off and the training signal inserted into the baseband signal stream is set by the user using the CoefCalcStartStep parameter. The start of the ramp, however, does not occur at the simulation step defined by the CoefCalcStartStep parameter; rather, the ramp starts at the conclusion of a waiting period having a duration given by the CoefCalcDelaySteps parameter. The simulation step where the training signal is inserted should be set bearing in mind the number of samples required for reasonably accurate synchronization of the input and feedback signals in the VSA simulation. The other CoefCalcModulationOffPeriod is a dependent system parameter that defines the number of steps for which the modulated signal is gated off.

Signal Levels

The peak magnitude of the ramp is determined by the value of the RampVPeak parameter. This parameter is arbitrarily set to 1.0 and is the value at which the ramp is held during the hold period of the ramp. A more important system parameter than the peak magnitude of the ramp is the relative magnitude of the modulated signal and the ramp. Scaling the magnitude of the modulated signal so that its peak magnitude coincides with the peak magnitude of the ramp sets the relative magnitude of the two signals. The dependent system parameter, cdma2000ScaleFactor, in the case where the kmm_CDMA2K_FwdRCSrc component is employed, determines the magnitude scaling required at the output of the modulated signal source.

It may be desirable in some instances to change the relative level of the modulated signal and the ramp, however, note that the peak magnitude of the ramp is also the peak input magnitude that is corrected by the predistorter.

Address Generator, LUT and Coefficient Functions

The AddressCalc component translates the magnitude of the baseband input signal into a look-up table address using one of three alternative addressing schemes:

  • linear (magnitude)
  • power
  • log power

The AddressMode system parameter determines which addressing scheme is employed. A scaling factor must also be passed to the AddressCalc component, namely, the system parameter AddressScale.

The look-up table is implemented by the LUT_RAM component. The number of entries in the look-up table is controlled by the LUTSize parameter. The look-up table is initialized at the outset of the simulation using values read from a pair of text files. The text files are passed to the LUT_RAM component using the LUTIInit and LUTQInit parameters. The text files would typically be located in the data directory of the project so a path need not be provided along with the name of the text file. The format of the text files is described in more detail in the notes accompanying the LUT_RAM component's dsn file.

The LUT_RAM initialization files can be generated automatically using two DesignGuide menu functions designed for use with the ESG and VSA digital predistortion simulations. These functions may be accessed via the Linearizer DesignGuide menu.

  • Initialize LUT Coefficients will automatically generate the inphase and quadrature initialization files so that every LUT entry is set to 1 + j x 0.0.
  • Update LUT Coefficients reads a text file (produced by the VSA simulation) containing a set of LUT entries in floating point complex notation and translates those entries into the appropriate format and writes the data to an inphase and quadrature initialization file.

Note

these functions assume that the fixed point precision being used in the look-up table is 32.32.

Before running the ESG simulation for the first time, all entries in the look-up table initialization files should be reset to the 1 + j x 0.0 value using Initialize LUT Coefficients . In other words, for the first run of the ESG simulation, the baseband signal that is generated is not predistorted, as each look-up table entry is unity. After the VSA simulation, the look-up table initialization files can be loaded with the newly calculated coefficient values from the VSA simulation using Update LUT Coefficients. When the ESG simulation is then executed for the second pass, the look-up table initialization files will contain the updated coefficient values and the baseband signal will be predistorted using the coefficient values.

ESG Interface and Simulation Length

The complex baseband modulated signal, with the inserted training signal, is predistorted in the ESG simulation prior to being loaded into the arbitrary waveform generator of the ESG. The ADS ESG_E4438C_Sink component is employed to link the ADS simulation environment to the ESG.

The carrier frequency of the signal output by the ESG is set using the ESGCarrierFrequency parameter. The portion of the predistorted baseband signal that is sent to the ESG is determined by the dependent system parameters ESGStartDSPPoint and ESGStopDSPPoint. The ESGStartDSPPoint parameter is dependent upon the transient period of the generated baseband signal, due to the length of the pulse shaping filter. In the case where the kmm_CDMA2K_FwdRCSrc component is employed, the transient period is given by the cdma2000TransientSamps parameter. The ESGStopDSPPoint parameter is set to be equal to the total number of steps in the simulation, which is defined by the user through the SimDSPPoints parameter. The value of the SimDSPPoints parameter should be set bearing in mind the number of samples required for the following.

  • Synchronization of the input and feedback signals
  • Adaptation algorithm to calculate a new set of LUT coefficients
  • New coefficients to be written to a text file

The output power of the ESG is controlled by the user via the ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter. The ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter is likely to be the only parameter that is required to be varied between each execution of the ESG simulation. Predistortion of the baseband signal will introduce expansion and thus will increase the signal's average power. However, if the expanded signal is downloaded to the ESG and the ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter is not adjusted, the expansion is lost and the absolute change in the magnitude of the baseband signal induced by predistortion will not be realized. The foregoing assumes that the scaling function of the ESG_E4438C_Sink component is enabled and that the ESG's automatic leveling control circuitry is able to maintain the average output power of the ESG. The automatic leveling control circuitry may not necessarily be able to maintain the output power level of the ESG and may force it into an `unlevel' condition. In such a case the output power of the ESG must be measured using a power meter and adjusted manually. In addition, the bandwidth of the automatic leveling control loop is potentially problematic. For the ESG, the loop's bandwidth is 100 Hz; therefore, the automatic leveling control will maintain a constant relationship between the baseband signal's amplitude and the absolute output amplitude of the ESG over the course of the ramp as long as the ramp is sufficiently short in relation to the total duration of the modulated signal.

The value of the ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter is initially set to an appropriate value given the amplifier under test and the peak input power of the PA that is correctable using predistortion. Following execution of the ESG simulation the DigitalPredistortion_v5_ESGSink data display file can be accessed where the average power of the baseband signal sent to the ESG is calculated. The absolute magnitude of this average power is not critical, rather, its deviation from one pass of the ESG and VSA simulation pair to the next should be noted so that the ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter can be set appropriately.

Note

After executing the VSA simulation and updating the look-up table coefficients, the ESG simulation should be run twice before starting the VSA simulation. After the first ESG simulation, the change in the average power of the baseband signal from the prior set of look-up table coefficients to the present must be taken into account in the value of the ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter. Thus, with the ESGAmplitude_dbm parameter updated the absolute output amplitude of the ESG will remain constant from one set of coefficients to the next.

A modulated signal is typically described in terms of its average power (Pav) and its peak to average power (PAR). The peak to average power is simply the peak power (Ppk) divided by the average power (Pav) and is often given in dB, i.e. 10 * log (Ppk / Pav).
The ESG output level is specified in terms of Pav only, not in terms of Ppk. Furthermore, the ESG 4438C ADS component scales the signal being downloaded to the ESG so that the peak magnitude is equal to 1.

For a given set of look-up table coefficients (perhaps all set to 1, as at the outset) the modulated signal that is being sent to the ESG sink will be described by PAR1 and Pav1. Similarly, when the look-up table coefficients change, the modulated signal's statistics change and result in PAR2 and Pav2. Because the 4438C sink scales the peak magnitude of the modulated signal to 1, we can write:

Pav2 x PAR2 = Pav1 x PAR1.

If PAR1 and PAR2 are calculated, since we have set the ESG to Pav1, the new output power of the ESG must be Pav2 = Pav1 x PAR1 / PAR2. If the Pav's and PAR's are described in dB, Pav2 is found by simply adding or subtracting dB values. Furthermore, the PAR of a signal does not change if it is scaled, i.e. the PAR of sin(t) is equal to the PAR of 2 * sin(t), thus, the PAR of the signal that is to be downloaded to the ESG can be calculated prior to the scaling of the peak magnitude to unity.

The adjustment required to the ESG level may therefore be directly obtained from the Main page of the ESG data display, where the difference between the average power of the input and output signals is shown in the following figure.

Input/Output Power Difference in ESG Data Display

Triggering

The ESG's EventMarkers parameter is set to "Event1" so that the ESG will generate a trigger on its Event 1 output each time the first sample of the predistorted waveform is read and transmitted by the ESG. The ESG's Event 1 trigger output is connected to the VSA's external trigger input.

Link to VSA Simulation

Three signals from the ADS ESG simulation domain are intended to be carried forward to the ADS VSA simulation domain:

  • (N4) the input signal to the complex adjuster (InputSignal)
  • (N6) the predistorted signal at the output of the complex adjuster (ComplexAdjustOut)
  • (N5) the integer trigger signal that gates the modulated signal off and initiates the ramp training signal (TriggerSignal)

These three signals are input to the VSA simulation by being read from the ESG simulation dataset using NumericSource components (N4-N6). All three signals are of the numeric type, with identical start and stop sample capture periods - ESGStartDSPPoint and ESGStopDSPPoint, respectively.

ESG Simulation Data Display

The Data Display file for the ESG simulation, DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_ESGSink .dds has two pages - Main and LUT Signals.

Main Page

The Main page shows plots of the timed input and output signal from the complex adjuster over the length of the entire simulation. This page also includes a power calculation for these two signals taken over the samples that are forwarded to the ESG and the VSA simulation. The average power of the input signal will not change between runs of the ESG simulation (provided only the ESG output power is changed with each run) and is provided for reference. The average power of the output signal from the complex adjuster will change every time the look-up table coefficients change. The difference between the average power of the input and output signals is shown on the Main page as well. This difference can be utilized by the user to set the output power of the ESG from one run to the next to ensue that the output level of the ESG is calibrated to the first run of the ESG simulation.

LUT Signals Page

The LUT Signals page contains two plots - one showing the look-up table read address and the other the output of the look-up table. These two plots can be used to check the operation of the predistorter.

VSA Source Simulation

The VSA Source simulation extracts a time record of the downconverted RF signal that is transmitted by the ESG from a properly configured VSA. The extracted time record is an input to the VSA simulation and forms the feedback signal that is used by the adaptation algorithm to calculate the open loop gain of the system and determine a new set of look-up table coefficients.

Like the ESG simulation, the VSA Source simulation relies upon a set of independent and dependent system parameters. The parameters of the VSA Source simulation can be further sub-divided into a set of parameters that are identical to those from the ESG simulation and a set of additional parameters. For simplicity, all of the parameters from the ESG simulation are copied to the VSA simulation. Although all of the ESG simulation parameters are copied, the VSA simulation does NOT utilize every one. The ESG simulation system parameters that are employed by the VSA simulation have exactly the same meaning in the VSA simulation as they have in the ESG simulation.

The length of the VSA Source simulation depends upon the length of the ESG simulation. The VSA simulation dependent system parameter VSASimStopDSPPoint is set to be equal to the length of the data to be read from the ESG dataset and the length of the data record loaded into the ESG.

VSA Interface

The time record of the feedback signal is extracted from the VSA using the VSA_89600_Source component. The use of a timed signal ensures that the VSA's sampling rate is set appropriately when the simulation is executed and the data is extracted from the VSA. The VSA simulation employs a time step equal to that used in the ESG simulation. The VSATStep parameter is set to the ESG simulation time step.

Although the sampling rate of the VSA will be automatically set, other configuration settings of the VSA are set and maintained for each execution of the VSA simulation using a setup file. The name of the setup file is assigned to the VSASetupFile system parameter. A setup file, VSA_Setup_One.set, is included in the data directory of the digital predistortion project. The VSA_89600_Source will automatically look in the data directory for the setup file.

Some of the more important VSA configuration settings that are defined in the file include:

  • VSA trace `B' be set to `MainTime'
  • VSA record length be greater than the number of points to be extracted from the VSA
  • VSA input is triggered by the externally supplied (ESG Event1 trigger output) trigger signal
  • VSA input range be set to maximize the dynamic range of the VSA

The VSA simulation parameter, VSAScaleFactor, must be set by the user to appropriately scale the data read from the VSA. The VSAScaleFactor should be set to be equal to the inverse of the desired linear gain, k, of the predistorter and amplifier cascade. The appropriate value for VSAScaleFactor can be determined following the execution of the VSA simulation for the first time using the loop gain calculation and plot found on the Feedback and Gain page of the VSA Data Display file ( DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_VSASource.dds ). The plot titled "Loop Gain (uncorrected)" shows the open loop gain of the system. The loop gain is described as uncorrected because the Glin factor has not yet been applied to the loop gain calculation. The portion of the plot that is of interest is that which coincides with the training ramp. The open loop gain over the length of the ramp should, ideally, be unity, however, with no predistortion present the non-linear gain of the amplifier will cause the loop gain to decrease as the power of the training signal increases. Normally, the amplifier will have a region at lower power within which it does operate in a relatively linear manner. The inverse value of the loop gain at a point within this linear operating region will determine the value of the VSAScaleFactor parameter. After the VSAScaleFactor parameter is determined the VSA simulation is calibrated and should be executed again to calculate the predistortion function coefficient values. Following this initial calibration step, the VSAScaleFactor parameter should not be changed over the course of the iterations of the coefficients that follow. Note that if the range of the VSA input is changed between iterations, the VSAScaleFactor will need to be altered to reflect the change in the extracted signal magnitude.

ESG Simulation Signals

Four system parameters are employed within the VSA simulation to identify the signals that are read from the ESG simulation dataset:

  • ESGSimDataset
  • ESGSimInputSignalVariable
  • ESGSimTriggerSignalVariable
  • ESGSimComplexAdjustOut

The name of the ESG simulation dataset and the three signals from the dataset that are to be read are assigned to the four system parameters appropriately.

Note

the ComplexAdjustOut signal that is extracted from the ESG simulation dataset is not used by the VSA simulation. The ComplexAdjustOut signal is simply passed onto the VSA simulation dataset using a numeric sink. In order to prevent an error message being generated at run-time it is necessary that the signal flow from the NumericSource that sources the ComplexAdjustOut signal be tied into the signal flow graph of the simulation. The VSA simulation includes a dummy multiplier and NumericSink at the output of the NumericSource that sources the ComplexAdjustOut signal to ensure that an error is not generated.

Feedback Delay Estimation

The delay in the feedback path is estimated by the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network. The Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network will estimate the delay between the input signal and the feedback signal using a specified level of granularity (interpolation). The input and output sample rate of the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network is the same, thus, even though the delay between the input and feedback signals is not an integer number of sample periods, the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network will delay the input signal by an integer number of sample periods, ensuring that the feedback signal is delayed an appropriate fraction of a sample period so that at the output of the sub-network the two signals are synchronized. The Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network generates two additional outputs that indicate the number of integer sample periods that the input signal is delayed (coarse adjust) and the number of fractional sample periods that the feedback signal is delayed (fine adjust).

Several VSA Source simulation system parameters are employed to control the synchronization of the input and feedback signals. The FineAdjustGranularity parameter determines the interpolation rate that the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network will employ to estimate the delay between the input and feedback signals and delay the feedback signal by a fractional amount. The Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network employs Lagrange interpolation to increase the rate of the input and feedback signals. As the value of FineAdjustGranularity is raised the simulation execution time will increase.

The correlation within the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network is performed on a block-by-block basis over a user defined number of lags. The CorrelationSymbols parameter determines the size of the block in terms of the number of modulation symbols. The dependent system parameter, CorrelationBlockSize, is the number of input samples contained in the block and is dependent upon the CorrelationSymbols parameter and parameter determining the number of samples per modulated symbol.

The simulation execution time can be kept to a minimum by ensuring that the correlation within the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network is performed over a small number of lags. The combination of the VSA Source simulation CorrelationMaxDelay and DelayUnderguestimate parameters are utilized to set the maximum number of lags for the correlation calculation and to keep it to a minimum. The value of the CorrelationMaxDelay specifies the maximum difference in simulation steps that the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network can correct for. The value of CorrelationMaxDelay can be kept low by setting DelayUnderguestimate to a value that is close to, but not over, the feedback delay. The DelayUnderguestimate value is translated into a fixed delay that is inserted into the input signal path prior to the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network.

The Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network includes the ability to latch the estimated delay between the input and feedback signals. The CorrelationBlockstoProcess parameter sets the number of blocks that the sub-network will process prior to latching the estimated delay. The dependent system parameter, CorrelationWindowLength, translates the value of CorrelationBlockstoProcess into a window that is used to control the latch of the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network.

Note

the Delay_Adjust_v2 sub-network will introduce a delay of two sample periods into the input and feedback signal flows and that this delay is NOT included in the coarse adjust value at the output of the sub-network.

Gain Linearization

Immediately following synchronization of the input and feedback signals the loop gain of the system is calculated. This loop gain calculation includes scaling by the VSAScaleFactor and should be close to unity. Furthermore, the calculated loop gain could be used directly to determine a new set of predistortion function coefficients. Unfortunately, due to an arbitrary phase offset that is present on the samples extracted from the VSA, the coefficients determined in this manner would also suffer from an arbitrary phase offset that would change from one iteration to the next. The phase offset is not, in general, a problem, however, is easy to remove and when removed leads to a set of coefficients that are more easily compared from one iteration to the next. The arbitrary phase is removed by selecting a sample from the loop gain and using the phase of the sample to uniformly adjust the phase of all other loop gain samples. This procedure assumes that the phase offset is constant across the entire training signal period.

The VSA simulation includes a section of signal processing that attempts to locate the point during the training signal at which the loop gain is the most linear, i.e. where the slope of the loop gain is a minimum. The magnitude of the gain at the point where the loop gain is a minimum is referred to here as the linearized gain and the Gain_Linearization sub-network is designed to determine that point and the gain.

The Gain_Linearization sub-network determines the slope of the magnitude of the loop gain using the magnitude of the training signal as the independent variable. The slope is calculated using a difference relation (i.e rise / run) between adjacent samples. Due to noise that will appear in the feedback signal path, the calculated slope is passed through a sliding window averager prior to determining the point where the slope is a minimum. The magnitude of the training signal is utilized as the independent variable in the gain linearization calculation because the training signal may not necessarily be linear in magnitude. For instance, if the training signal ramp has a quadratic shape, the change in the magnitude of the training signal from one simulation time step to the next is not uniform.

The independent system parameters of the VSA simulation that control the operation of the gain linearization processing are:

  • GainLinRunGainLinearization
  • GainLinPresetGainLinMagnitude
  • GainLinSmoothingWindowLength

The GainLinRunGainLinearization parameter is intended to be assigned "Yes" or "No", depending upon whether the user desires that the gain linearization be performed. The default setting is "No" . If gain linearization is NOT to be performed, the value of the GainLinPresetGainLinMagnitude parameter is utilized as the linearized gain and thus the magnitude of Glin is as follows.

If GainLinPresetGainLinMagnitude is set to unity, the VSAScaleFactor parameter can be used to completely determine the value of Glin. If gain linearization is to be performed, Glin will depend upon the magnitude of the minimum gain output by the Gain_Linearization sub-network and the value of the VSAScaleFactor parameter. If gain linearization is to be performed, it should only be performed the first time that the VSA simulation is executed. After the first execution, the magnitude of the linearized gain should be noted from the Feedback and Gain page of the VSA simulation's Data Display file and entered into the GainLinPresetGainLinMagnitude parameter.

Whether gain linearization is to be performed or not, the Gain_Linearization sub-network is always executed to select a loop gain sample whose phase is used as the basis for the removal of the phase offset from all other loop gain samples. Hence, the GainLinSmoothingWindowLength parameter should be set to an appropriate value. The length of the smoothing window will depend upon the amount of noise in the system and the length of the training signal. Due to the presence of the smoothing window, the Gain_Linearization sub-network skips the initial and final GainLinSmoothingWindowLength / 2 samples of the loop gain over the course of the training signal. Therefore, the value of the GainLinSmoothingWindowLength parameter should be sufficient to reliably result in the minimum slope of the loop gain being located, but also ensure that an excessive number of samples at the start of the training signal are not skipped.

The VSA simulation includes a series of four dependent system parameters that are used to control the signal processing of the Gain_Linearization sub-network:

  • GainLinSmoothingWindowDelaySteps
  • GainLinControlWindowDelaySteps
  • GainLinControlWindowLength
  • GainLinWaitingSteps

These parameters are primarily concerned with maintaining the correct timing of the various signal data flows in the simulation.

Accumulator Initialization Files

Although the power of the training signal is increased smoothly over its duration, the predistortion function is quantized to the number of entries in the look-up table. In order to quantize the calculated loop gain values an accumulator is employed. The accumulator separately integrates the calculated loop gain that corresponds to each of the quantization levels of the predistortion function. The mean value of the accumulator output for each quantization level is the loop gain utilized to update the predistortion function coefficient values. In order to calculate the mean loop gain at each quantization level, the accumulator maintains a running total of the number of loop gain points integrated at each quantization level and outputs that number alongside the integrated loop gain.

The accumulator must be provided the file names of two initialization files that are used to preset the accumulator entries. The VSA simulation system parameters AccumRAMCoefInit and AccumRAMNumInit are assigned the name of a pair of initialization files for the accumulator's RAM associated with the integrated totals and the number of points integrated. The integrated totals are fixed-point values, while the number of points integrated are integer values. The files for a 256-entry accumulator are copied to the /data sub-directory by the DesignGuide. A series of initialization files for the fixed-point and integer entries for various accumulator sizes can be found in the /data sub-directory of the Linearizer DesignGuide in HPEESOF_DIR/DesignGuides/projects.

Note

The accumulator is reset before the start of the integration period, thus, the data transferred to the accumulator from the initialization files is obliterated before it is used. The VSA simulation can be changed so that the accumulator is not reset before execution with the data loaded into the accumulator (all zeros) at the start of the simulation determining the state of the accumulator entries at the start of the integration period.

Observe that the accumulator actually integrates the inverse of the calculated loop gain. In addition, the accumulator may be a Cartesian accumulator or a polar accumulator. The Linearizer DesignGuide includes sub-networks that implement both types of accumulators while maintaining the same set of component parameters in each case - see Coefficient_Accumulator_RAM (the default) and Coefficient_Polar_Accumulator_RAM_v2.

Convergence Control

The rate at which the adaptation algorithm converges can be controlled by the LUTMagConvFactor and LUTPhaseConvFactor system parameters. The parameters may simply be left at unity, however, if a slower rate of convergence is desired the value of the parameters should be changed accordingly. The text within the Convergence_Control sub-network describes how the convergence control is implemented and how to set the parameters.

Coefficient Calculation and Output

The primary steps employed within the VSA Source simulation to calculate a new set of predistortion function coefficients include:

  • loop-gain calculation
  • determination of the linear gain and phase offset
  • scaling of the loop gain by the linear gain and correction for the phase offset
  • integrating (accumulating) the (scaled and phase corrected) loop gain over each entry of the quantized predistortion function
  • calculation of the new predistortion function coefficients using the average integrated (scaled and phase corrected) loop gain and loading of those coefficients into the LUT

To perform these steps and maintain synchronization of the various data and control signal flows in the VSA Source simulation, a number of dependent system parameters are utilized. A number of these parameters have been discussed above. Those not discussed are those having the CoefCalc, AddressWrite, and UpdateLUT prefix. The relationship of a number of the VSA simulation parameters to the steps involved in the calculation of the new coefficient values is shown in the following illustration.

Relationship of Various VSA Simulation Parameters

The gain linearization (when GainLinRunGainLinearization = "YES"; default is "No") is performed coincident with the training signal received through the feedback path, but for a delay introduced by the smoothing window of the gain linearization signal processing block (GainLinSmoothingWindowDelaySteps). The waiting time from the start of the ramp to the completion of the gain linearization is given by the value of GainLinWaitingStep.

Following gain linearization the scaled and phase adjusted loop gain is fed to the accumulator. The accumulator is reset prior to the arrival of the loop gain data from the training ramp. The accumulator is reset over a period of time steps equal to the number of entries in the accumulator starting at the time step coinciding with the first sample of the training ramp. The length of the accumulation period is equal to the length of the training ramp and is specified by the CoefCalcAccumulate parameter. For the purpose of controlling the write address of the accumulator the AddressWriteDelaySteps and AddressWriteLength parameters specify the relative starting time step of the accumulation period and the length of the accumulation period.
The accumulated loop gain data output by the accumulator is averaged, used to calculate the new predistortion function coefficients and written to the look-up table over a period of time steps equal to the size of the accumulator/look-up table plus one. The CoefCalcUpdateCoefDelaySteps system parameter controls the relative time step at which the process of reading and averaging the data from the accumulator begins.

The predistortion function coefficients are updated and loaded into the look-up table by multiplying the averaged output data from the accumulator with the existing coefficient data being read simultaneously from the look-up table. The inactive look-up table RAM that contains the updated coefficients is activated following the update period. The UpdateLUTDelaySteps system parameter specifies the relative time step at which the look-up table update signal is generated to activate the new set of coefficients. The UpdateLUTDelaySteps system parameter is dependent upon the CoefCalcIterationPeriod system parameter. The latter specifies the number of time steps in the coefficient calculation period.

Just before the end of the simulation, the new set of predistortion function coefficients are read from the look-up table and output to a text file using the Printer sink.
The name of the text file is assigned to the CoefCalcLUTDataFilename system parameter, while the initial and final samples of the data to be written are given by the CoefCalcStartStepOutputLUTValues and CoefCalcStopStepOutputLUTValues, respectively.

VSA Source Simulation Data Display

The Data Display file for the VSA simulation, DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_VSASource.dds contains five pages - Main, Spectrums, Correlator Signals, Feedback and Gain and Coefficient Values.

Main Page

The Main page contains four plots. The two upper plots show the magnitude of the input signal from the ESG simulation and the magnitude of the scaled feedback signal extracted from the VSA over the entire duration of the simulation. The lower two plots show the magnitude, and the real and imaginary components, of the same input signal and scaled feedback signal over a block of 512 samples.

The upper two plots are useful for charting the performance of the predistorter as each iteration of the predistortion function coefficients is performed. Ultimately, the two plots should be identical if the predistorter and amplifier cascade is resulting in linear amplification.

The lower two plots provide additional insight into the relationship of the input signal and the feedback signal, specifically, the difference in their magnitudes and phase.

Spectrums Page

The Spectrums page is intended to compare the spectrum of the predistorter output signal to the spectrum of the scaled feedback signal. The page includes time domain plots of the two signals over the duration of the entire simulation as well. The spectrums are derived from the segment of the time domain signals occurring before the insertion of the training signal. The time limits of this segment are controlled by the value of the ki1 and ki2 parameters. The average power of the signals over the length of the segment is also calculated and displayed. Note that the spectrums that are plotted are a smoothed version of those actually calculated.

Correlator Signals Page

The Correlator Signals page displays the CoarseAdjustDelay and FineAdjustDelay values determined during the execution of the VSA simulation. A review of these values provides the user with a check on the operation of the VSA simulation. The page also shows two plots that compare the magnitude of the delay adjusted input signal to that of the feedback signal. The upper plot compares the two signals over a 256 sample window, while the lower plot compares the two signals over a 100 sample window and over a smaller magnitude range. The plots can be used a check on the correct operation of the delay adjustment block. Prior to the delay adjustment point the signals should be offset from one another, however, after the delay adjustment they should overlap. The lower plot can also be used to view the magnitude of the noise that is present on the feedback signal.

Feedback and Gain Page

The Feedback and Gain page provides basic information from the VSA simulation that can be used to calibrate the feedback signal and also ensure that the simulation is running properly. Displayed on the page are the CoarseAdustDelay and FineAdjustDelay values, as they were on the Correlator Signals page, as well as the magnitude and phase of the linear gain that was used during simulation to scale and phase correct the calculated loop gain.

The upper two plots on the Feedback and Gain page displays the magnitude of the difference in the magnitude of the input and feedback signals after synchronization. The two plots show the error measurement over different periods of the simulation, with the upper most plot taken over the length of the training signal ramp and the lower over the entire length of the simulation. The error measurement is useful over the course of the training signal to show how effectively the predistorter is reducing the difference between the signals. A lack of synchronization or proper scaling is readily identified from the value of the error measure. The error measure taken over the length of the simulation shows the difference in the signals prior to synchronization and following synchronization. The change in the error measure following the first estimation of the feedback delay should be visible from the plot. The amount of change will depend upon the degree to which the signals are not synchronized initially and the quality of the estimation of the feedback delay from the synchronization processing block.

The bottom plot on the Feedback and Gain page shows the calculated loop gain taking into account only the VSAScalingFactor parameter, i.e. prior to gain linearization. This plot can be used to calibrate the VSA simulation by adjusting the VSAScalingFactor parameter so that the loop gain of the linear operating region of the amplifier under test falls at the desired magnitude - normally around unity.

Coefficient Values Page

The Coefficient Values page plots the LUT read address and the output of the LUT coefficients in terms of their magnitude and phase. The `EntryMarker' of the LUT Read Address plot is employed to extract the coefficients from the LUT output signal starting at the appropriate simulation step. At the end of the VSA simulation the LUT read address is swept sequentially through the entire LUT address range. Thus, if the data of the LUT Read Address plot is moved to show the LUT read address ramp, the `EntryMarker' can be place by the user on the first address (zero) of the address sweep. With the marker in place, the lower plot will display the predistortion function coefficients that were determined and stored in the LUT.

Using Other Wireless Signals and Multi-Carrier Signals

The ESG and VSA simulations are provided with an included cdma2000 single-carrier forward link signal source. Other signal sources are provided under the Source Peak-to-Average Ratio (PAR) Tests menu and may be substituted for the cdma2000 source. There are several source-related VAR items on the both the ESG and VSA simulations; these should be compared to the desired source test bench obtained using the Source Peak-to-Average Ratio (PAR) Tests menu and modified accordingly. The multi-carrier signals, having a wider bandwidth, require more samples per bit or chip than do the single-carrier signals.

To substitute another signal source, perform these steps:

  1. Transfer the relevant VAR item parameters from the PAR test bench to the ESG and VSA test benches, as well as the source subnetwork
  2. Run the PAR test bench and note the value of the peak magnitude (see CCDF and PeakMagnitude Display for Test_PAR...Test Benches) and ensure that this value is included in the expression, e.g.:
cdma2000ScaleFactor= RampVPeak / cdma2000PeakMagnitude

where RampVPeak is typically set to 1 V.

Templates

(Please also add the top-level designs to the Reference section under the heading Digital Predistortion using ESG-VSA)
DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_ESGSink
AddressCalc
AddressCalc_subcomp1
Async_Ramp
Async_Triggers
Edge2Pulse
Edge2Pulse
kmm_CDMA2K_FwdRCsrc
LUT_RAM
DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_VSASource
AddressCalc
AddressCalc_subcomp1
Address_Generator
Async_Ramp_v2
Coefficient_Accumulator_RAM
Convergence_Control
Delay_Adjust_v2
Lagrange_Interp
Edge2Pulse
Gain_Linearization
Async_FindMin
Edge2Pulse
LUT_RAM
Magnitude_Limit
Test_PARofModSig_OQPSK.dsn
Test_PARofModSig_ADS_WCDMA.dsn
Test_PARofModSig_ADS_4xWCDMA.dsn
Test_PARofModSig_CDMA2K_FwdRCsrc.dsn
Test_PARofModSig_cdma2000_ForwardLink_Generator.dsn
Data Display Files (.dds)
DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_ESGSink.dds
DigitalPredistortion_v5p0_VSASource.dds

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